Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains

There are all kinds of motorcycle events though few focus on the best thing about your motorcycle – riding it.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – I’ve attended many events, often as a vendor, but few focus on the best thing about your motorcycle – riding it.

Most shows, rallies, and gatherings center on one thing – getting you off your bike so you can reach your wallet. Park it here, pay to get in, visit our vendors. OK, so they have a place in the big scheme of things. You get to ride there and back, maybe play a few riding games in the grass to entertain the crowds, but mostly you and your bike part ways for the duration. I seem to end up at them too often, and I’d rather be riding.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – typical rally scene. Surrounded by some of the best riding in the world, the bikes sit idle, the riders milling about wondering what next? Riding opportunity wasted.

Looking back on this year, two events hit the mark for me. Well run, well organized, and all about the ride – the RoadRUNNER Magazine event in Maggie Valley and The Smoky Mountain Motomarathon in Asheville / Fontana. Both were firsts for the Smoky Mountains region and both impressed someone who believes motorcycles are best enjoyed when riding them. Both endured weather conditions that kept most bikers in the lazy-boy watching the tube, yet the riders who came went out on the road every day and had a blast.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – Well organized rides made for an outstanding RoadRUNNER Magazine event in Maggie Valley, NC. The weather did not stop the riders from having a great time on their bikes. Lining up for the days adventures one wet morning. The weather cleared, and it was a great time.

The RoadRUNNER Magazine Event in Maggie Valley drew several hundred riders. Each morning they set out in small groups led by a guide to show them the way. There were a variety of destinations, skill levels, lengths of ride, even some dual-sport routes. At the end of the day, riders returned to a catered dinner and swapped stories beneath a circus-sized tent. Off to bed, then back on the road the next day. The handful of vendors were there to give support to the riders, to address the needs that came up when you get so many bikers together. Despite several days of rain, the groups went out each morning and came in happy every evening.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – I got to enjoy one of the dual sport rides at the RoadRUNNER magazine event, one of the highlights of my year. There was something for everyone at this well run gathering, all had a great time.

The Smoky Mountain Motomarathon drew only a couple dozen riders, but those that attended were the hard core enthusiasts that go unsung in the magazines and print. These men and women came in from all over the country and Canada, most riding from home to participate in an event designed to challenge their skills and fortitude. When greeted by Hurricane Sandy with the winds, rain, snow, and ice, they cheerfully saddled up each day eager to get out and ride whatever came up. They enthusiastically went out in conditions that kept cars off the road, and every one of them returned safe and sound each night, ready to embrace the next day.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – Photo from one of the Smoky Mountain Motomarathon riders during the event as Hurricane Sandy added to the already challenging routes. It slowed them down, but didn’t stop these hard core riders. Awesome event, pretty sure the weather will be better next year.

As you hunker down for the all-to-long winter season and your thoughts turn to riding goals for next year, consider these two events for your calendar.  They were both firsts, and if you’d like to see them back let the organizers know it’s what you want to see more of. I know it’s my kind of motorcycle event, and I’ll lend my support again next year if you want to see more like them.

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders

Best Motorcycle Events for Riders in the Smoky Mountains – bagging a checkpoint in the Motomarathon – Each rider is issued a badge. Route sheets are dispersed at the last minute. As you ride the routes you verify your checkpoints with a photo of your badge at each location. Points scored for each checkpoint. Cool idea.

If this is your idea of what makes a great motorcycle event, let these organizers know you want more of it. Contact them, show you are interested, and I’ll do what I can to help make it happen for you.

RoadRUNNER Magazine – http://www.roadrunner.travel

MotoMarathon –  http://www.motomarathon.com

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wayne busch - Smoky Mountain Motorcycle Rider.com

Wayne Busch

– Wayne Busch lives in Waynesville, NC, where he produces the most detailed and comprehensive and up-to-date motorcycle pocket maps of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains to help you get the most of your vacation experience. See them here – AmericaRidesMaps.com

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Wayne is an advanced motorcycle instructor for Total Rider Tech teaching Lee Parks Total Control Advanced Rider Courses. Isn’t it time you looked into advanced rider training to ride more confidently and safely? It can transform your mountain riding experience.  Total Rider Tech

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Motorcycle Safety – Respect and Skin in the Game

I don’t remember much, it was almost 40 years ago. My first thought when I regained my senses was to find the piece of the bike which had the key in it – didn’t want somebody stealing it. Obviously, I was still rattled a bit. That was the last ride for that Honda CB 450.

I remember the dog that shot out of nowhere as I rode home, I may have been coming from high school. It came running out of a cow field and right into the bike. Almost went down, but found myself riding along the sandy shoulder of the road. Hardly suited to off-road riding, I was rolling on the throttle to keep the front wheel of that heavy Honda from washing out in the soft sand, picking up speed.

I remember thinking I was doing pretty good on this bike in those conditions, heck, I’d saved it, but making the coming curve meant I needed to be back on the pavement.  I picked my spot only to find there was a deep gully where so many cars had run wide and a mound of patch built up in a futile attempt to fill it.

I remember the loud bang as the front wheel hit the asphalt.

I remember looking straight down at the pavement as the now vertical bike landed on the front wheel and for an instant it seemed to balance and roll along in control. Then the bars were jerked violently from my hands as the front end buckled, and it was slow motion silence as I floated through the air doing a somersault.

I remember thinking “This is going to be a bad one”.

* * * * *

How to Avoid Skinning Yourself Alive – Brittany Morrow from Brittany Morrow on Vimeo.
Direct link – http://vimeo.com/22897515

Looking at my helmet my head probably contacted first. Considering my injuries, I then laid out on my back and slid down the road and into the pasture. The bike probably took out the barbed-wire fence just before I went through it, no deep cuts or lacerations.

I remember walking along the road thumbing for a ride. I knew there was a fire station nearby, if I could get there they could help me.

I remember the cars slowing down, I looked fine from the front, then taking off when they saw the bloody mess where all the skin had been taken off my back. The light cotton shirt and blue jeans I was wearing in the summer heat of Florida might as well have been paper. No protection at all. Last time I would ever ride without at least a jacket.

I spent the next few weeks lying face down on the fold-out couch as my wounds healed. Most of that was in a codeine stupor. Seems every joint in my body had donated some flesh. A few scars remain, but the years have faded most of them. There would be more to come before I learned the value of leather and then textile gear.

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Direct link – http://youtu.be/Uz748Q4tkGo

I don’t often tell this tale. There are others. So why bring it up?

I spent a few hours this weekend at a rally. Don’t really like doing events, it can be pretty boring. You end up doing a lot of people watching.

Many of the riders were from out-of-state, groups from Georgia, Florida. Standard biker attire, blue jeans and a t-shirt. Some wore shorts. Slip on shoes. Many of the passengers wore only jeans and a tank top. Some pretty ladies. Not even wearing gloves. The smallest skid lids that would keep you from getting pulled over.

I went through my recent photos. All too common attire. Photos of riders on some of the most challenging roads they will ever see, for the first time. You can often see the look on their faces that tell the ride is demanding something from them.

I watched Daryl’s (Killboy.com) recent 12 minute video from the Dragon. Easy to spot the bare flesh rolling by, particularly the passengers, on one of the most challenging and dangerous motorcycle rides in the world.

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WAKE UP PEOPLE. Riding in the mountains is some serious sh*t. RESPECT IT.

Go off the road up here and road rash will probably be the best of outcomes. We’ve got rocks and trees right up to the roadside. You’ll probably be plunging over a steep hillside or worse yet a rocky cliff. It takes hours to get a rope team out to haul your inured body up to the ambulance.  Show some freakin’ respect for it.

Word to you “easy riders”watch the video – You know who you are. Low and slow and always in control. Too hot to wear gear. I like the feel of the wind and the sun, yadda, yadda, gonna work on my tan. Gotta look the part with the right biker attire – blue jeans, your biker t-shirt, the tiniest helmet you are forced to wear – I never planned any of the motorcycle accidents I’ve had. Most happened relatively close to home. Just a short ride, a commute, running to the store, work, school, going to hang out with my buds,  etc. Almost all have been under 30 mph. Just riding along minding my own business, taking it easy, la-la-la. If there was skin exposed, it was skin in the game, skin lost.


Direct link – http://youtu.be/EhJ74f-MGak

PS – I’m not just posting this  for you flatlanders – it’s pretty common up here as well. As if that big fat bike is going to protect you. Gotta look the part, dress like everyone else, feel the freedom! WAKE UP. Think about all those times you’re rounding a curve and there’s a car half in your lane coming at you. All those times some old geezer pulls out at 10 mph in front of you. It’s always the worst of curves where the cars slip off the inside edge and kick gravel and rocks onto the road. You KNOW it happens. You KNOW what I’m talking about.

Forget the blue jeans. Useless. Repeated personal experience. You’ve got 2 choices – textile or leather. If you can get some armor in there it will help keep bones from breaking. Respect the ride. If you don’t need it, at least respect your rider and get her the right gear. She’s trusting in you, do her right.

If there is skin exposed, it is skin in the game, a game you are forced to play every ride. 

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Wayne Busch

Wayne Busch - Cartographer

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– Wayne Busch lives in Waynesville, NC, where he produces the most detailed and comprehensive and up-to-date motorcycle pocket maps of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains to help you get the most of your vacation experience. See them here – AmericaRidesMaps.com

Wayne is an advanced motorcycle instructor for Total Rider Tech teaching Lee Parks Total Control Advanced Rider Courses. Isn’t it time you looked into advanced rider training to ride more confidently and safely? It can transform your mountain riding experience.  Total Rider Tech

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Why Am I Kicking Off the Asheville Bikefest 2011 at the Easy Rider Motorcycle Show?

Photo - Easyrider Events

Easyrider Events

It was a busy week that found me in four states, the last of which was South Carolina at the Greenville Easy Riders Bike Show where I spent the day promoting the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run coming next spring. This is a difficult post for me to write as I don’t want to get on the wrong side of so many who are involved with motorcycle events, people I need to work with, people who buy my America Rides Maps, and those for whom motorcycling has a different appeal. Please try to forgive me my viewpoint. In general, I don’t do events, it’s not for me.

Photo - Setting up at Bike show

2 Hours to set up before the doors open. Mark and Yvonne prepare our stall.

For those who are involved, it’s a tremendous amount of work and hassle. I shudder at the tough life of being a vendor, the constant travel, set up and break down, long days spent trying to stand out from the rest of the crowd and reach people, hoping the weather cooperates and people turn out in sufficient numbers to make it worthwhile. I’ve done it a few times and I respect those who either make it their living or spend their efforts doing promotions for products and manufacturers.

Photo from Easyriders Bike Show

Quite the assortment of custom motorcycles at the show - unfortunatley, they're not my cup of tea.

Nor do I go out of my way to attend events – The circus formula always seems the same. Vendors, bike shows, stunt shows, loud music, festival food and (not so cheap) cheap beer, bike games, yadda yadda. Of course the crowds who attend are generally as much a part of the experience as anything else, people and bike watching is one of the best parts, there’s always something that has you shaking your head for one reason or another. I suppose it’s as good an excuse as any to visit new places, a reason to ride somewhere, and for some it seems to be all about chasing the next party.

Photo - Amazing detail work on this trike

The detail work on some of these machines is amazing but for me they are just enormous paper weights - too delicate to ride.

Despite this viewpoint, I was up at 4 AM Saturday morning loading my stuff in the truck quite happy to be rendezvousing with Yvonne and Mark Cresswell, promoters of the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run for the ride down to Greenville.  I was eager to spend the beautiful fall riding day in a booth encouraging people to come to the event next spring. WHY?

Photo from Easyrider Bike Show

Hundred of hours, thousands of dollars to build a bike you don't dare ride. While I appreciate the dedication and effort, I'm still a function beats form guy.

For me, motorcycling is all about the ride. “Go” trumps “show” for me. Function beats form. Give me the bike that best lets me engage the road and relate to the ride. Sure I appreciate the esthetics of my machine, but my days of cleaning chrome, fretting every blemish and speck, washing, waxing, and polishing, and pondering the next piece of bling are long over. I’ve got better things to do with my time, I’d rather be out on the road.  The reason I’m so enthusiastic about the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run and why I believe in it – it’s about the riding.

Photo - concept bikes at show

Either concept bikes or movie props, I couldn't determine if they actually moved under their own power. I wouldn't want to have to ride one of these very far.

Located just minutes from the Blue Ridge Parkway and hundreds and hundreds of miles of some of the best motorcycle riding found anywhere, the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run can’t help but become one of the nations major motorcycle events because it has so much more to offer the motorcycling visitor simply because of its geography. Combine one of the worlds best motorcycle riding locations with the talent and experience to coordinate a major event, throw in the outstanding scenery in a location within easy reach of millions of riders, add the spice of fun and funky Asheville, and you’ve got a recipe for an experience that will satisfy any taste. As the spring rally at Myrtle Beach continues to implode and burn out, this new star is rising thanks to the Cresswells at Worldwide Dynamics.  Their legacy of involvement with promoting some of the biggest motorcycle events such as Sturgis, Laconia, Leesburg, and others bring the connections and clout to not only bring in the big dogs from the factories, but be selective in choosing the best of vendors and entertainment.

Photo - skeleton on a motorcycle

Halloween themes were timely this late in October.

Last year was the first Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run and we all wondered if it would go at all. Approvals and commitments did not come in until the last minutes and the opportunities for pre-promotion were scant. Most of the big dogs know better than to invest their time in a first year show. It’s a hurdle you’ve got to clear, a bar to jump to show it can be done. That leap is behind us now and the majors are making their commitments.

Photo - the Route Master at work

Me at the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run helping you find the best rides and routes.

I’ll be back again this year acting as “Route Master” (unless we come up with a better title). Let Mark handle the Bikefest end of things. My mission is to get you out to enjoy the riding just as the first warm spring weather breaks and the trees and mountain foliage are in full bloom. There are so many outstanding motorcycle rides nearby you can come back every year for the rest of your life and ride a great new motorcycle route each time, though I suspect you’ll develop a handful of classics that are worth revisiting over and over. I think I did a good job last year giving out 30 local ride maps – trust me, nobody rode them all. I’ll be your resource to help you plan those daily excursions, route you to the best of the best, and help you discover the hidden sights and treasures that abound.

 

Photo - Yvonne on her Royal Enfeild

Yvonne on her 2010 Royal Enfield Military Edition motorcycle, a design virtually unchanged since 1955. She really likes it.

Pencil in May 12 – 15, 2011 on your calendar for the Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run. Kick off your riding season with a bang, get outfitted, test ride that new bike, and discover the undiscovered secrets that make the Smoky Mountains one of the best motorcycling regions in the world. It’s all about the ride.

Asheville Bikefest and Blue Ridge Run 

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Wayne Busch
Wayne Busch – Cartographer
– Wayne Busch lives in Waynesville, NC, where he produces the most detailed and comprehensive and up-to-date motorcycle pocket maps of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains to help you get the most of your vacation experience. See them here – AmericaRidesMaps.com

 

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Pre 1916 Coast to Coast Motorcycle Race Going On? Here are the photos!

http://www.motorcyclecannonball.com/ – here are some of the photos I took this morning.

Photo - Cannonball motorcycle run

Bust? Highly likely

I can’t adequately describe this event so I’m just going to give you the link right off the bat. See for yourself, follow them as they progress, it’s just hard to believe it’s actually happening.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle run

7:30 AM and getting ready

For those of us in western North Carolina, it’s not all that unusual to see vintage motorcycles from time to time thanks to Dale Walksler’s Wheels Through Time Motorcycle Museum in Maggie Valley.  Not only does he have one of the most extensive collections of early motorcycles, and a historical representation of the Harley Davidson line, but they all run and he races them. More than once I’ve been cruising through Maggie Valley when he pulls up alongside on one of the vintage motorcycles out for a spin.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle run

Not all the bikes were vintage - THIS WAS MY FIRST ROAD BIKE! 1974 Harley Davidson 90cc

I watched the bikes straggle in last night. They filled the A Holiday Motel in Maggie Valley as well as 2 others. I got to talk with the support crews and some of the riders.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Excelsior Motorcycles were well represented

What’s it like riding one of these? They’re lucky to hit 50 mph so you don’t get windblown. The seats are fairly springy. It’s not all that bad – so they say.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Plenty of early Harleys

On the other hand, going up hills is a challenge. I think those pedals get used. Things fall off – like brakes.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Lots of Indian Motorcycles

Electrical problems, particularly magnetos, are a problem that can stop you dead and tough to resolve.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Somehow they got the magneto repaired on this Indian.

A lot of these guys were up till the early morning hours in Wheels Through Time repairing the bikes to keep them running.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Not all the bikes were restored to original condition

It was interesting to see what it took to make these bikes run. The right fuel mix, careful coaxing and monitoring, and a lot of attention.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Some bikes were in mint condition

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Would you race this baby across the country?

48 bikes started the race. Some had already dropped by this 3rd day. Will any make the west coast?

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Getting them started is a challenge

They average about 200 miles per day. The longest day is 300 miles. No interstates. Only one rest day. Holy cow.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

I wouldn't know where to start to work the controls

I hope they make it. I’d like to see it become an annual event, though I don’t know how long the bikes could make repeated trips.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

You couldn't pay enough to duplicate the finish on this machine.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

The detailing on this machine attests to its authenticity

It’s something to see motorcycles nearly 100 years old not only running, but racing.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Best to get an assistant to do the starting

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Is that a "cheater tank" on this Harley?

Some of these guys were stopping to fill up every 20 miles.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

With VERY limited range, this was the way to go.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

A police escort helps

it’s pretty cool to see these old bikes. It’s even cooler to see them run. But when you see them take off down the road to race, it just defies coolness and becomes something beyond.

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

People came from surrounding states to see the event.

Follow the progress, read the trails and tribulations of the riders a thttp://www.motorcyclecannonball.com/

 

 

 

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

The race is on!

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Another racer hits the road

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Dude, that flag is gonna slow you down!

Photo - Cannonball Motorcycle Run

Horsepower Ok. Dog power - disqualified.

If you like this you need to pay a visit to Wheels Through Time Motorcycle Museum in Maggie Valley, NC.

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Wayne Busch

Wayne Busch - Cartographer

 

– Wayne Busch lives in Waynesville, NC, where he produces the most detailed and comprehensive and up-to-date motorcycle pocket maps of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains to help you get the most of your vacation experience. See them here – AmericaRidesMaps.com

 

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Cannonball Vintage Motorcycles in Maggie Valley

I just got a couple photos this evening, bikes were still coming  in and heading to Wheels Through Time motorcycle museum on the Cannonball cross country vintage motorcycle race.

Photo - vintage Harley

One of three similar vintage Harleys in the Cannonball motorcycle race.

I’ll head over first thing in the morning when things get organized and the bikes are all together to head out and get some more pics. They’ve taken all the rooms at the A Holiday Motel in Maggie Valley.

The bikes were just rolling in this evening. Too scattered for good photos. More in the morning.

The bikes were just rolling in this evening. Too scattered for good photos. More in the morning.

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Wayne Busch

Wayne Busch - Cartographer

 

– Wayne Busch lives in Waynesville, NC, where he produces the most detailed and comprehensive and up-to-date motorcycle pocket maps of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains to help you get the most of your vacation experience. See them here – AmericaRidesMaps.com

 

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Waiting to Hear About the Asheville Bikefest and the Blue Ridge Motorcycle Run

Photo - The Headquarters building

The big log building in the background was the headquarters for the event - as Route Master I rarely left it.

From before the gates opened to well after they closed, I spent the last four days at the Asheville Bikefest and yet I never really saw it. As Route Master for the event I was stationed in the luxurious air conditioned headquarters building and tasked with helping folks get out and ride the fantastic motorcycle roads in the surrounding area. I rarely stepped outside nor ventured far from my post.

Photo - the Route Master at work

A printer, 30 routes, and me at work helping you find the best rides and routes.

Flanked by two long tables stacked with 30 motorcycle ride routes for people to choose from, I spent much of my time running back and forth to the printer to maintain the supply. There were great motorcycle rides in most every point of the compass, up and down the Blue Ridge Parkway, and to several of my personal favorite motorcycle roads. It kept me busy. When my wife came down Saturday to help me out, I urged her to take a few minutes and grab some photos. She probably saw more of the event than I did.

Photo - vintage Triumph Bonneville

A vintage Triumph Bonneville parked right out front - I rode one of those back in the day and find myself back on a Triumph today. Great bikes!

I met folks from as far away as Maine, New York, Florida, and a whole lot from South Carolina and Virginia. Considering the remnants of the Myrtle Beach Bike Rally were going on simultaneously, it was encouraging to see so many who had chosen to come here instead, a sure sign that beach venue has lost it’s luster. Most who came seemed to be local. It was a surprising turnout considering all the competing events in the region and up and down the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Asheville-Bikefest-pics

Yamaha / Star / Boss Hoss and other big rigs set up in one corner. There was a steady stream of demo rides the whole time.

I expect more photos soon. I saw some wild ones from The Anti Team Stunt Show with the bikes in flames. When I caught the last of them on Sunday, they were pulling out all the stops and those boys went home with some painful souvenirs.

Photo - stunts provided by the Anti Team

Three stunt shows each day from the Anti Team kept getting better and better. They kept finding more stuff to blow up or burn, sometimes themselves.

I was there, but I can’t tell you much about it. I was too busy. I’ll post more as it comes in. If you made it, let me know what you thought and I’ll try to do even better next year. Unlike others, this event is all about the great motorcycle riding and should be one you add to your motorcycle vacation plans.

See some cool videos of the show at http://theantiteam.com

For routes and maps: http://americaridesmaps.com

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Great Motorcycle Riding Weather is Killing Me, Must Work On Asheville Bikefest

Photo-bikes-sit-idle

All fueled up and ready to go, the bikes collect dust instead of miles.

Clear blue skies, lush green mountainsides, temperatures in the 80’s, the first lavender rhododendron blooms are popping open to join the showy azaleas while the white dogwood trees are finishing their lower altitude show. Flowers are in bloom everywhere you look, miles and miles of empty two lane roads lead out in all directions. Fresh tires and a sparkly clean motorcycle prepped and ready for the challenge rest quietly in the shade of the carport under a dusting of pollen, the headlights eerily sad and dark longing to spark to life and shine with a roaring brilliance as they seek each new bend in the road. Come ride me, I’m ready for you. Taunting, teasing, tantalizing, it waits for something I can’t deliver right now.

Photo-mountain-scenery

A photo from just down the road - the mountains are calling and I can't go.

For the next week it’s all about the Asheville Bikefest. As the official “Route Master” for the event I’ve got duties that must be served. The 13th is rushing at me like it’s pegged to the red line and I spend every spare moment getting things in order. Jumping from computer to computer as one gets tied up with processing the printing, the other pulls together the 30 or so routes I’m asked to prepare. It’s not hard to choose them, rather it’s the time involved in getting them in a form for output and reproduction. All the while the sunshine streams through my office windows and the view of the blue skies and green mountainsides beyond the glass has me pining away for just a little saddle time.

Image-asheville-bikefest-poster

Asheville Bikefest May 13-16. I'm doing everyhting I can to make sure you have the best time.

The road time will come, but not on my schedule. It will be in those last few days just prior to the event as I ride out to experience the routes first hand, identify where any problems and hazards lurk, and confirm the Blue Ridge Parkway is fully open on the sections required and identify the best detours as needed. If past experience holds, when the time comes to get out on the road the heavens will open up and I’ll pass the miles in torrential downpours, but I’m so accustomed to that it no longer matters. Still, while the sun shines it’s tough to be on the wrong side of the window glass.

I’m giving all I’ve got to make the Asheville Bikefest as successful as possible for it’s kickoff year. The rest is up to you. There is no better place to be on your motorcycle than the mountains surrounding Asheville. The weather is ideal, the flowers are blooming, fresh beer is flowing from the breweries, and the bands will be playing all day. Plenty of affordable rooms, campsites, cabins, and even luxury accommodations are waiting. I hope to see you there.

http://ashevillebikefest.com

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Motorcycle Group Riding Video – Good to review before the Asheville Bikefest

I stumbled across this video and with all the rides scheduled at the Asheville Bikefest May 13 – 16, it’s a good one to review. There will be guided tours as well as self-guided rides and something to satisfy most any motorcycle rider. With all the bikes in town, it will probably come in handy up on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erpkyD7SMfw

Asheville Bikefest

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Asheville Mayor Welcomes Bikefest

I pulled this off the Asheville Bikefest site – http://ashevillebikefest.com/
Image - Asheville Mayor Terry Bellamy Welcomes Bikefest letter

Asheville Mayor/motorcycle rider Terry Bellamy Welcomes Bikefest

Mayor rides. Nice to see a city that’s so motorcycle friendly. It should be. Sitting right in the heart of the best motorcycle rides in the country, good to know you’re welcome here. Asheville has so much to offer.

How about –

“Asheville Voted Top Beer City in America: “Beer City USA”
Music Venue – “Rolling Stone: Orange Peel one of top 5 music clubs in the U.S.”
Outstanding Attractions – “Biltmore – America’s Largest Home”
You really should look into this motorcycle event and start making plans. May 13 – 16.
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Mission Improbable – Leesburg, FL

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to attend the motorcycle rally in Leesburg, Florida, and invite motorcylists to come visit Maggie Valley and discover the best riding in all the land.

So now I’m an agent, an agent of the TDA – the Tourist Development Authority. No badge, no gun, no secret weapons. Just my wits and experience, and all the maps I can bring. Who would have thought one day I’d actually be on a mission for the government. But they needed a man with special talents, with unique experience, and a true believer willing to make the sacrifices necessary to get the job done. When they came to me, I couldn’t turn them down.

Why me? Those in the know put me at the top of the list. They’ve discovered a secret – once people discover the amazing back roads and fantastic scenery they flock here to enjoy it. Still, too many people never probe the depths of the vast wealth of great riding found here. If only they knew how to find the thousands of miles of twisty two lane mountain byways that lie hidden in these hills, they’d not only come, but they’ll come back.

Sure we’ve got the best portion of the Blue Ridge Parkway. And yes, you can look out the window into Great Smoky Mountains National Park. And Deals Gap with it’s infamous “Tail of the Dragon” is just over the next hill. Those well known attractions already bring a lot of people to town and put heads in beds. And yes, we’re within a 6 hour ride of half the population in the USA.

But what most people don’t recognize is this is more than a tourist destination with just a few attractions. This area is a gold mine. You can’t see it all in one trip. Or two trips. Or even an entire season. It’s time to let the cat out of the bag. That’s my mission.

Local lodgers, restaraunts, and businesses want you here. The red carpet is out. Your room is ready. My mission is to get you a map. They’ve learned the secret. “Give a man a room he stays for a day. Give a man a map, he stays for a week, and he comes back again with his freinds.”

So in a week or so I depart from the cool and comforting cradle of my mountains to venture into the hot foreign turf of Florida and attend the huge rally in Leesburg. It’s going to be tough. But I know my mission and I’m letting you know I’m coming. You are my contact. I’ve got to get this secret information to you. Look for me at Leesburg rally. Code word – Maggie Valley.

Wayne@americaridesmaps.com

>> Go to America Rides Maps.comhttp://americaridesmaps.com

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